If you’re looking for inspiration for your next Facebook Campaign, look no further! We’ve asked our experts to weigh in on effective Facebook ad copy and strategy.


First, it’s a good idea to look at what not to do:

This intentionally vague copy could apply to anything for sale at eBay. There’s really no reason for anyone to click on the ad. -Sam Mazaheri, Director of Marketing and Product, AdStage


Compelling content is still king, and eBay’s ad above fails to hit the mark with its vague messaging. Be sure to make sure your content is effective.

Content should be great regardless of the medium or platform. A click is just a click if no other action is taken, and Facebook is no exception.

Projecting a clear and concise message aligned with your brand is step one and should be a core component of any creative campaign.

Utilizing a strong CTA and encouraging an action is key. As a whole, readers are more likely to perform an action when asked: Click Here, Learn More, Buy Now. – Dayna Moon, Sr. Director of Social Advertising, 3Q Digital

Content is king, but personalization is key too! If your ad doesn’t speak to the viewers, they aren’t going to click it.

The best examples of Facebook ad copy are the most personalized. For example, if I’ve recently visited a product page, seeing an ad with that exact product image, plus any relevant product details such as product price, ratings, related offers, etc., will be highly relevant. Given I’ve already shown interest in this product, the ad will certainly catch my eye and I will most likely click on it.

Similarly, if I’m planning a vacation and then see a Facebook ad with an image for the same destination, plus relevant details such as my travel dates, specific hotel ratings and reviews, etc., again this will be so relevant that I will most likely click on the ad to continue planning my vacation. Ads such as these leverage great ad copy – dynamically generated in real time for each individual user – and are excellent examples of Facebook ad copy that drives engagement and results. On the other hand, very generic ads are rarely relevant enough to be seen, let alone to drive action. –Alison Morris, Director of Marketing, Triggit

Keep it brief! The acronym TL;DR exists for a reason, and no one should think that while scrolling past your ad.

Good ad copy is usually short and sweet. Filling up the max character allowance to get a long idea across often results in a “scroll past.” So keep it short, intriguing, and to the point. Give an idea of what you are, but be sure to let the creative do some talking as well. A great blend is important. One of the better copies I’ve seen had a picture of bright shirts with the simple text: “Shop summer shirts under $30 –>free shipping.” -Bill Cleere, Ad Operations, Optilly

Don’t forget to include an appropriate and dynamic image. A picture is worth 1,000 words, after all.

I have found that a great image seems to have the largest impact on Facebook ad copy. Testing images is always my first round of ad testing, followed by a second round of features and a third round of calls-to-action. Finding the right image is huge in gaining the right kind of attention and clicks. -Kristina McLane, Account Manager, Hanapin

These tips are a good refresher for keeping your Facebook ads fresh. Do you have a favorite tip you didn’t see here? Be sure to let us know in the comments.

1 Comment

  1. Adam October 25th, 2014

    Awesome tips Jonathan!

    I remember when I started using FB ads a year ago. I wasted a lot of money with no any leads. Then after tries and tries of optimizing I figured out that great appropriate image is the key! Like you said.

    It really needs a time after you find the right image which will bring people to click trough. My tips are always to make like 5-6 similar ads of same niche with different images and titles, and after few days leave the one which brings more traffic.

    Thanks for your share and best regards,

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Jonathan Svilar
joined 3Q Digital in August of 2013 with a background of sales and marketing in the dynamic live concert industry. Jonathan graduated from the University of California, Santa Barbara with a degree in Literature and Philosophy and a passion for technology. In his spare time, Jonathan is an avid motorcyclist, San Francisco Giants fan, and the proud parent of a fuzzy bunny and a dog.