When garlands go up, sales usually go up as well. So let’s optimize what you’re doing, and reiterate some basic strategies that you should be using because if you don’t you’ll lose out on the obvious sales.

Take a moment to go through the three components of what I consider to be the minimum amount of effort you should be putting into your holiday Facebook advertising efforts.

Component #1: Repackage your offering

Get into the season. Take what you sell, cover it in nice wrapping paper, and tie a bow on it. When you’re creating your ads, focus on what people will find interesting enough to click on and make sure you deliver on the expectation you set up.

If people are clicking a Christmas-themed ad and it in no way resembles anything on your landing page, the magic is lost. Similarly, if you invite people to join your email list under one pretense and deliver something different, guess who’s not going to be thrilled?


Clicking the ad above brought me the landing page below. Notice the color matching, the immediate mention of the deal offered in the ad, and the additional sweeting of the deal with an extra $10 off and mystery gift. Nice work, Rosetta Stone.


Make your offer special– either a reduced price, additional bonus content, or a new seasonal freebie. Then keep it consistent throughout your communications.

Component #2: Target your existing fan base

Yeah– I just wrote that. It’s obvious, right? Well, it should be.

As long as you haven’t paid some 3rd-party company to load your Facebook Page up with likes, then it’s comprised of fans who know you and like what you do. If your audience is bloated with paid clicks, skip this step because you’ll be paying to advertise to legions of ghosts, and everyone knows ghosts don’t have capital.

You know who else has warmed up to you? Your email list. These people really like you and may have even purchased from you. Load that baby up to Facebook and let it churn out a custom audience that’s sure to convert. Take it a step further and separate out the audiences to those who’ve purchased and those who haven’t.


Let’s not forget about the people who visit your website. Drum up a Website Custom Audience and direct all your website visitors over to your pretty little sales page of yours. Take a few minutes and get deep into those retargeting features. There’s so much opportunity there, and setting this up will only bolster the rest of your efforts. Consider excluding people who’ve already purchased.


Component #3: Don’t just guess whether it’s working

Use conversion pixels. Every page that someone sees only after they’ve either opted-in or purchased something should have a unique conversion pixel on it.

While you may be able to measure the increase in traffic coming from Facebook or the unusual number of program sales, you won’t know which specific ads are responsible for it and should therefore be scaled up– and if there’s one meta rule for advertising, it’s don’t make any assumptions. One ad may have lower CTRs, but it could very well be the one converting the most customers.


Repackage your offer, retarget your existing fan base, and track the return on your investment. If you can do all of this and have some fun getting into the holiday spirit, then this season is sure to bring you success.

1 Comment

  1. Marine Lee February 4th, 2015

    These tips & effort regarding Facebook advertising & ad campaign is very appreciable. Countless businesses have created Facebook ad campaigns so that they can build loyalty and brand image.

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Alex Broderick-Forster
Alex is the founder of Earn Enough, a Facebook advertising consultancy. He's been featured by Inc. Magazine as one of "6 Masters of the Remote Working Universe," recently taught workshops at Chris Guillebeau's Pioneer Nation 2015, and has been identified as a top instructor on Udemy with his Facebook Retargeting Pro course.