We’ve seen a ton of good resumes for openings at 3Q Digital (more on those careers, if you’re interested). But a good resume, sadly, doesn’t always translate to a good interview. If you’re up for a job and get the chance to strut your stuff in person, it’s a good idea to follow these tips – in any industry!

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-Ask lots of questions. Come with a list (actual paper) of at least 3 to 5 questions, so they know you’re prepared and interested. You don’t have to ask all of them, but it’s good to have them just in case.

-If you speak to multiple people, it’s okay to repeat questions to get different perspectives. They will likely all ask if you have questions, and it’s better to repeat some than ask nothing.

-Check out the website and make sure you know the basic information about the company: basic history, if it’s owned by a larger entity, what they do… itsounds obvious, but you’d be surprised. Brownie points if you can toss in some info during the interview, like “I noticed on the website that you have offices in X, Y, Z; would this position involve travel to the other offices?”

-Be positive about previous and current jobs. Obviously you leave for a reason, but try to frame it in a good way, e.g. “Company Y was a great place to work because xyz, but I feel like my opportunities for advancement and expanding my knowledge have hit a plateau because….”

-Remember that you’re interviewing the company as much as they’re interviewing you. If you’ve gotten to the in-person interview stage, they probably think you’re a strong fit – on paper. The interview gives you both a chance to see if there’s a cultural fit as well. You’re going to spending at least 40 hours a week working with these people, in this environment, so the work environment and colleagues are an important part of the equation.

-Don’t dress like a schlub, even if it’s a casual office. I’m not saying you have to show up in a suit, but a t-shirt and jeans is not going to impress. It’s an interview – show that you’ve made at least some effort, even if it’s the only time you’ll ever wear a button-down shirt (skirt, blouse, etc.) to the office!

-Some good questions to ask:

-Is this a new or existing position? If existing, you can try to find out why the current person is leaving.

-What is the expected career path?

-What is the company or office culture like?

-What do you think will be the biggest challenges for someone coming into this position?

-What are the best things about working at this company?

Good luck! It’s a jungle out there, so make sure you’re putting your best foot forward. And if you have any other helpful tips, please leave a comment!

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Laura Rodnitzky
Laura Rodnitzky is VP of People at 3Q Digital; she has been with the company since August 2009, having previously worked in marketing and editorial roles for internet and finance companies. Laura also spent several years living abroad as an English teacher, translator, writer, and student. Laura speaks fluent Spanish and decent Chinese and French, and she has been known to fake her way through German, Dutch, Italian, and Portuguese. Laura has a degree in Linguistics from the University of Chicago.