A few months ago, I reviewed the framework I use to have an opinion and use that in my work day to be an effective PPC manager. In this post, I’d like to focus more on the communication portion of that framework. It’s easy to forget, but the language used when communicating an opinion can soften or strengthen your position dramatically.


Take a look at these message variations for the same recommendation presented on a client call:

1. We want to add mobile-preferred ads with shorter copy that includes the CTA up front.

2. We will add mobile-preferred ads with shorter copy and a CTA in line 1.

3. I think we should add mobile-preferred ads with shorter copy and a CTA in line 1.

4. We plan to add mobile-preferred ads. These ads will feature shorter copy to accommodate the smaller screen and a CTA in Description Line 1 since line 2 is not always shown.

Which one do you think works best?

Variation #4 is the clear winner.

The problem with 1 & 3 is that they rely on very weak language and the intent is lost in the “want,” “think,” and “should.” There’s seldom a time when these words are useful when delivering a clear recommendation or opinion to a client.

Stick to action-oriented verbs (hmmm…sounds like an ad copy best practice!) and always follow up statements with clear reasoning why this is the best next step. The surest way to avoid questions and convince the client that you know what you’re doing is to anticipate any concerns within your argument. This lets the client know you are confident and are considering their unique needs.

You know you’re an SEM expert, but it’s time to start using language that communicates that knowledge to the people around you!

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Caitlin Halpert
Caitlin Halpert is an Account Director at 3Q Digital. She has worked in digital marketing since 2011 and held positions at Dealer.com and iSearchMedia before joining the 3Q team in March 2014. Caitlin graduated from Dartmouth College and is a native of Vermont.