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“Learn to evolve and change because what was a month ago no longer is today.

Survival is the ability to adapt and change when it’s needed.”  EarlGrey, SEO

About a month ago, I wrote a post about using Automated AdWords Bidding successfully for the first time. At the time, I believed I was writing a post that showcased how clever I was in figuring out how to use an aspect of AdWords that I had previously dismissed as only useful for folks that don’t know how to professionally manage paid search accounts.

However, when I look back at that post, I see something somewhat personal and quite dark – something even the most experienced account managers can fall prey to – pre-judgment. After all, so my original thinking went, Automated AdWords Bidding is stupid because I’m letting Google decide where to bid and how much to bid (up to my stated limits), therefore Google will choose what’s best for Google and not for my client.

But, let’s take a step back now…

What is “AdWords Automated Bidding”? It’s a tool.

Is a tool inherently good or bad? No. A tool is only good or bad based on how it’s being used.

How do most people use AdWords Automated Bidding? They use it as a substitute for actively managing their campaigns, which isn’t ideal for account success.

How did I use the tool? As a vehicle for professional paid search management. And the tool met my expectations and needs.

Now, please go back and watch the above clip from Apollo 13. In it, the NASA engineers were tasked with saving the lives of astronauts using a bunch of items not well-suited for that purpose. However, because the engineers were bright, creative, out-of-the box thinkers, they were able to successfully accomplish their task.

Pre-judgment caused me to not act optimally on my client’s behalf as it pertained to Automated AdWords Bidding. Fortunately, I saw the error of my ways and coached myself to success.

Recently, AdWords announced a whole bunch of changes that most in the paid search industry are very upset about. I also question what AdWords is doing…especially making “rotate ads” a 30-day maximum setting.

But, then, I “remove myself” from the situation and look at it from a more objective perspective.

Am I pre-judging what Google is doing? Yes.

Can my clients and I actually profit from Google’s changes? Yes.

Are Google’s changes actually a disguised opportunity for future growth and success for my clients and me? Yes.

How might that be? I’m working on it.  :.)

 

It now becomes incumbent on my teammates and me to make Google’s changes work for us instead of being controlled by them.

Game on!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Todd Mintz, Senior SEM Manager