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When you’re launching a new channel for a client, there is an inevitable learning curve when it comes to account setup, campaign builds, optimizations, and analyzing performance. Although no client is exactly the same, and a client-specific strategy is important to drive performance, it is equally important to understand the basic framework of a new channel to ensure a solid foundation for success.
Pinterest is a great channel for brands looking to excite and inspire new customers. People come to Pinterest to plan and search for ideas to “pin,” so it is very important for brands to get in front of users early to help influence their decisions. With that said, I will dive into the basic steps to build a client Pinterest account.

Getting Started on Pinterest

Before you can start running ads on Pinterest, there are a few housekeeping items that need to be checked off:

  • Create a business profile: This can be set up via business.pinterest.com or by converting an existing organic profile into a business profile.
  • Set up your ad account(s): Depending on how your client’s marketing team is organized, multiple ad accounts can be included under one business profile so that billing can be segmented accordingly.
  • Claim your website: Verify the authenticity of your client’s business homepage.
  • Account access: Have your client grant access to anyone who will be working on the account.
  • Implement the Pinterest Tag: Before you spend a dime on advertising, make sure to install a Pinterest Tag to track performance, including up to 9 different conversion events.

Ad Account Management

With these steps out of the way, you can now get your hands on the ad accounts. After you’ve logged into your client’s business profile, you can select the specific ad account you want to access. Once you’re in Ads Manager, a good starting point is to build out some initial audiences so you can target your ads to specific user groups. You can select from four audience types: Visitors, Customer List, Engagement Audience and Actalike Audience.
Common audiences include website visitors that have been to your client’s website within a set range of time or an actalike audience that mimics the profiles from your client’s customer seed list.

Next, we can start building out campaigns, ad groups, and ads for Pins. For starters, you will want to select the campaign goal to best match the conversion event your client is optimizing toward. From the campaign level, you can also set the daily or lifetime budget or choose to make this decision at the ad group level, which typically allows for more control and budget efficiency.

At the ad group level, you are able to include the audiences you previously created and exclude any audiences that may cause internal competition in your account and drive up CPCs. The ad group level offers numerous targeting features including: Genders, Locations, Languages, Devices, Placements, Interests and Relevant Keywords. As you fill out your targeting specifications you are able to view the potential audience size, based on Pinterest’s estimated monthly average users, in a box on the right column of the page to ensure your ad group has adequate volume.
With your campaign goals set and ad group targeting in place, it is now time to build out your ads. To create an a,d you will select a Pin to promote from one of your client’s boards and overlay with ad text. Best practices for Pinterest ads include:

  • Use vertical image pins to take up as much real estate as possible (size: 600×900)
  • Include your Brand logo
  • Use vibrant colors and product/service descriptions to grab and keep users’ attention

Once your ads are launched, you can begin inspiring your target Pinners. With these basic Pinterest account setup steps in mind you should be well-positioned for a successful initial account build and launch.