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facebook remarketingWhen it comes to Facebook advertising, one of the concerns we hear most often is conversion rate. For those of you who are having issues generating sales or conversions from Facebook, here is a bit of advice: accept it.

For the campaigns we’ve managed on Facebook, our clients have cared most about traceable sales and conversions. Brand awareness, fan building, audience nurturing, and other strategies are important – but in the past we’ve been charged with revenue-centric objectives.

I can already feel fingers hovering over keyboards ready to strike and pound out scathing comments saying something like, “Don’t accept lower conversion rates,” or, “It’s not just about the direct sale,” or, “You’re not optimizing your Facebook campaigns properly and this is why your conversion rates stink.” Sure, some of this may be true. In general, we have found that conversion rates in general from Facebook are lower in comparison to our other channels – for eCommerce as well as lead generation.

We have accepted this fact. For sure, we generate sales and leads from Facebook; often our CPA is higher than average or our ROI is not as strong. However, we also view Facebook as just part of the conversation with our audience (usually the beginning).

So if a Facebook click is an introduction with a prospect, how do you keep the conversation going? Well, remarketing is an excellent way to continue an ongoing dialog with your social media visitors.

Facebook visitors are not in a purchasing frame of mind, and this often leads to lower conversion rates. They were on Facebook, probably interacting with friends and family, probably posting cat or baby pictures (or is this just me?!) when our ad piqued their interest. Great! They may or may not convert. If they don’t, we will seize the opportunity to deliver supplemental ads that will hopefully gain their attention again, and they’ll convert at a later time. This works well!

For many of our campaigns, we send Facebook users to segmented landing pages. This way we can deliver messaging specific to this channel, but also this allows us to create unique Remarketing segments. We have found that sending users to custom tabs within Facebook works well, and sending users to external landing pages works OK too. (If you are using a custom tab, you should still be able to drop a remarketing pixel through an iFrame.)

We run most of our remarketing through Google AdWords. Now you can either deploy a specific snippet of code for your Facebook landing pages, or you can just utilize the AdWords smart pixel to target these pages at the URL level (I suggest the second method!).

When it comes to ad messaging for these campaigns, remember that your audience may have interacted with your brand briefly. Run ads that mention “Learn more about Product X,” or, “Still Need Issue X Resolved.” This type of messaging carries on the conversation that you started with the first click or two from Facebook.

With this strategy, someone can start on Facebook and end with a Google Display Network conversion. If Facebook visitors are segmented within your campaign, there should be no problem with attribution. Also, the multi-channel attribution reports within Google Analytics will provide deeper analysis for revenue, ROI, AOV, and other mission-critical stats for your Facebook campaign – especially if you remarket to these visitors.

In summary, if your Facebook ads don’t convert at the rate that you need, don’t get frustrated – just accept it. However, this doesn’t mean that you have to like it. And this doesn’t mean there isn’t anything you can do about it! Utilize remarketing to target Facebook visitors – and generate that sale!

 – Joe Kerschbaum