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Whether you’re onboarding a new client, trying to better understand your customers, preparing for a new product launch, or looking for new ways to optimize — at some point, you’ll probably need to build out new customer personas.

Customer personas can be an incredibly valuable resource for account optimizations and general understanding of your customers. Let’s go through the steps of researching and building customer personas, shall we?

Research

Facebook
Facebook is the obvious place to start since one big fundamental tenet of your build is to create audiences on the platform. A great place to start is the Audiences tab, where you can start comparing converters to Facebook’s overall audience. It’s important here to hold on to no preconceived notions of who the audience is; you may just be surprised by what you find.

CRM Software
It’s likely that your client has some sort of CRM software that they’ve been using to keep track of their customers. Take a look through this data (again, leaving any judgments at the door). What segments tend to drive the most sales? Who are the most efficient segments to go after? Are the findings in line with Facebook’s data? Why or why not?

Client
It’s unlikely that any of the information uncovered thus far will come as a major shock to the client, but there could be some useful learnings. Both Facebook and CRM software deal with the past, but the client can provide valuable insights on the future — namely, useful information on audiences that they would like to reach. Additionally, they may have upcoming products or initiatives that will attempt to reach new audiences. Because of this, it’s always a good idea to speak with the client about specific groups that they would like to reach more often or more efficiently.

Audience Development

Demographics

When developing your customer personas, it’s usually best practice to start with the basics. This usually means identifying specific demographics that have proven to be especially efficient for your client. The most common demographic that marketers use are as follows.

  • Age
    • This can be especially valuable if the product is designed for people of a certain age or if there are age restrictions.
  • Gender
    • Who tends to use your product or service? Is there consistency based on traffic and efficiency of conversions?
  • Location
    • Sometimes the easiest way to optimize is to focus on (or negate) specific locations. This could be countries, regions, states, or cities.
  • Income
    • This can be particularly valuable when there are a wide variety of price options available or the customer’s product is on the costly side.

Interests

This is where audience development requires a bit more creativity. It’s tempting to just choose broad interests and let that be it, but often the more tailored the interests are the better an understanding you can get about the persona. For instance, if you’re building a persona that is focused on one particular competitor, select interests that are tailored to unique aspects of that competitor’s product or service. Obviously this is fairly general and requires a fair amount of educated guessing, but there’s always the option of pausing poor performers and testing new audiences down the road.

Build

The detail that is put into each specific persona depends on the amount of data at your disposal and the broadness of the client’s product or service. As always, it’s important to make each audience similar in size and specificity in order to properly test the different ad sets.

Once built out, it’s usually best practice to roll out one audience at a time (negating the previous audiences from the targeting). Doing this will ensure no overlap and help to ensure the ad groups are running efficiently.

 

There’s a lot of leeway here, which is good because no two clients are the same, but hopefully this can spark some inspiration while building out customer personas!