I was working with a company on their paid search campaign, and as part of the campaign set-up process, I created a remarketing campaign for them. Unbeknownst to me (until after it happened), they participated in a few daily deal offerings, and initially, I thought these efforts would have no relevance or impact on their PPC campaign. That assessment was totally incorrect.

A bit about the company:

  • Niche, highly dynamic inventory.
  • Highly latent buyer (meaning few purchases happen on the first visit to the site…sale usually happens 1-14 days later).
  • Reasonably high-priced product.
  • Ultimately, the way the daily deals were structured, they didn’t really reduce the cost of the purchase by a huge amount.

The daily deals drove a huge number of people into the remarketing pool, where they stayed for 30 days – the length of the cookie chosen for the campaign. Ultimately, the company had more sales from remarketing than from purchased PPC clicks, and the CPC and CPA numbers for retargeting were way lower than they were from PPC.

Many people think that remarketing campaigns only are for remarketing to paid search traffic. That is totally incorrect; people who land on the page with the remarketing code become part of the retargeting pool, no matter how they got there (paid search, organic search, social media traffic, etc.). With remarketing, any method that delivers relevant traffic to your website at a reasonable cost gets you the privilege of marketing to those people for as long into the future as you feel is advantageous to your business.

Clearly, you need to examine the economics of daily deal sites to determine whether they are a good investment for your business. Keep in mind, though, that remarketing is a very advantageous side benefit to these marketing efforts that you might not have thought about. Plus, once the daily deal is over, you are still “selling” to the daily deal customers, and if they end up purchasing from you after the daily deal ends, you’ll keep 100% of the sale.

Retargeting lets the advertiser “keep pitching” their wares to visitors…and they could ultimately overcome the objection that caused the site visitor not to purchase the first time. Sort of like this:

Todd Mintz, Senior Account Manager

– Questions? Comments? Email us at bloggers at ppcassociates dot com.

1 Comment

  1. Scott Cowley October 25th, 2011

    This is a great tactical approach to retargeting, but it does bring up some questions about making the approach successful:

    1. How to maximize click-through to the site, where they’ll become part of the retargeting pool.
    2. Are people coming back through retargeting and purchasing items that they didn’t buy during the daily deal? Same item at a higher price?

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Todd Mintz
Todd Mintz, who has been with 3Q Digital since March 2011, has worked in search engine marketing since 2000 and has used Google AdWords since it began. He also is very visible in the SEM social media space and is a curator/contributor at MarketingLand. He was one of the founding members of SEMpdx (Portland’s Search Engine Marketing Group), is a current board member, and writes regularly on their blog.