youtube logoWelcome back to our Marketers’ Guide to YouTube series! If you’ve read the first two posts, you should know why to use YouTube and which of the two platforms to use and when. Today’s topic: ad types!

There are five types of YouTube ads: in-search, in-stream, in-slate, in-display, and preroll. We’ll break down how they appear, which platforms offer them, and best use cases. Here goes…

In-Search Ads

Also known as promoted video and formerly known as YouTube advertisements, in-search ads appear on the search screen of YouTube.com.

When would you use them?

They’re your best bet among YouTube ads if your primary objective is driving conversions, since the browser has already expressed some intent. If you have a brand channel, you definitely want to own brand search terms so you are able to show the video of your choosing. If the product or service advertised fits a particular need, such as apparel, it also makes sense to run them for search terms for tips or how-to’s.

When wouldn’t you use them?

If the goal is to maximize views at the lowest CPV, search is not the best channel; it’s usually more expensive than other options.

Supported by AdWords or AdWords for Video (AWFV)?

Both.

Example:

in search ad

 

In-Stream Ads

These ads are skip-able long-form video content shown as a pre-roll to other video content. Think of them as affordable (less expensive than in-search), well-targeted, skip-able commercial spots.

When would you use them?

In-stream ads are best for awareness, branding, and video views. They’re a great way to get in front of a new audience at the very top of the funnel (from there, you can use retargeting to reengage users). They’re also good for driving views in general, though the views tend not to be the best quality since the run time is shorter than other ad types.

When wouldn’t you use them?

They’re not the best option for driving conversions or quality views.

Supported by AdWords or AWFV?

AWFV only.

 

In-Slate Ads

Non-skip-able pre-roll to other video content; must be selected by users among several options. In-slate ads have limited volume, but they’re great long-form options.

When would you use them?

Great for branding plays and when it’s vital that users see the entire video. Volume may improve as Google pushes for more original long-form content.

When wouldn’t you use them?

If you need volume or direct conversions, in-slate ads aren’t the best choice.

Supported by AdWords or AWFV?

AWFV only.

Example:

in slate ads

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

In-Display Ads

These come in one or more of three formats. They’re shown in the Google Display Network, with the displayed form being based on both the advertiser’s and webmaster’s settings. Also known as promoted video.

When would you use them?

These work best when you have an engaging piece of content that users would want to click and watch. They drive higher-quality views than in-stream ads, since the video must be selected. These are also best ad type for managed placements (if you want the ad to show alongside specific videos only).

When wouldn’t you use them?

You wouldn’t use them if the content isn’t enticing enough for the viewer to select on his/her own.

Supported by AdWords or AWFV?

Both.

 

Preroll Ads

These are 15- or 30-second non-skip-able spots. They’re most comparable to television commercials and work on a CPM basis.

When would you use them?

They’re great if you have a 15- or 30-second commercial or video ready to go; they’re good plays for branding and awareness. Great for something like a new product release.

When wouldn’t you use them?

Don’t use them to drive views; this is the only ad type that doesn’t count towards views.

Supported by AdWords or AWFV?

AdWords only.

Example:

preroll ad

 

By now, you should be an expert on why/when to use YouTube, which of the two platforms to use (and when), and which ad types you prefer. Just released: a guide to YouTube targeting! Stay tuned.

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